Masculinity & Race on Montana’s WWII Home Front

Masculinity & Race on Montana’s WWII Home Front

Come hear Dr. Matt Basso talk about his new book, Meet Joe Cooper: Masculinity & Race on Montana’s WWII Home Front on Friday from 12:00-1:00 in…

Dr. Wilfred Samuels receives Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.’s Educator of the Year Award!

Dr. Wilfred Samuels receives Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.’s Educator of the Year Award!

Dr. Samuels was selected as a recipient of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.’s Educator of the Year Award! The Iota Iota Iota Graduate Chapter of Omega Psi…

CSBS 2014-2015 Scholarship Applications Available!!

CSBS 2014-2015 Scholarship Applications Available!!

Is your major in the College of Social & Behavioral Sciences? Then be sure to read this! The College of Social and Behavioral Science is…

Spring 2015 classes! New Pacific Island courses and a CEL course!

Spring 2015 classes! New Pacific Island courses and a CEL course!

Registration has officially opened and open enrollment begins on 11/24. When considering spring courses, keep in mind that we have several new courses! Click on…

LECTURE: Modern American Race Relations & Institutional Violence

LECTURE: Modern American Race Relations & Institutional Violence

Come see a lecture that features Dr. Edmund Fong and SL County District Attorney Sim Gill, taking place on 11/20 at 2:00 pm.

14th Annual Hunger Banquet!

14th Annual Hunger Banquet!

The University Service Coalition in collaboration with the Alumni Association at the University of Utah are pleased to invite you to the 14th Annual Hunger…

Dr. Dolores Calderon Awarded the 2014 Taylor & Francis Best Paper Award!

Dr. Dolores Calderon Awarded the 2014 Taylor & Francis Best Paper Award!

During the the 2014 American Educational Studies Association annual meeting in Toronto, Canada, Dr. Calderon was presented with a certificate and check for her paper, entitled “Uncovering…

Standing on Sacred Ground Film Viewing at SLC Public Library–FREE

Standing on Sacred Ground Film Viewing at SLC Public Library–FREE

December 4 Episode 1: 3:00-5:00 p.m. Episode 2: 6:00-8:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. For questions contact Erin, 801-585-3440 Visit StandingOnSacredGround.org for upcoming screenings and news…

Armando Solórzano Publishes We Remember, We Celebrate, We Believe/Recuerdo, Celebración, y Esperanza Latinos in Utah

Armando Solórzano Publishes We Remember, We Celebrate, We Believe/Recuerdo, Celebración, y Esperanza Latinos in Utah

The history of Mexican Americans in Utah is complex, but it is a history that is neither well represented in the mainstream literature nor well…

WHY ETHNIC STUDIES?

To be profitable and successful, businesses and organizations have to embrace diversity. They need to understand a diverse consumer/client population and cater to diverse groups by tailoring their products and services. For this, they need a diverse workforce. Ethnic Studies can help you easily move and work across borders—cultural, religious, racial, or international—and become an attractive job candidate.

WHAT CAN I DO WITH AN ETHNIC STUDIES MAJOR?

Ethnic Studies doesn’t prepare you for a career. It prepares you for multiple career choices! Employers teach you the job skills you need, but they don’t teach you how to successfully navigate an ever-changing and increasingly diverse world.

HOW DO I GET STARTED?

First, make an appointment to meet with the Ethnic Studies Academic Program Manager and Advisor, Elizabeth Archuleta, Ph.D.

Hours: 7:00-4:00.

Next, check out our website. Start by clicking here to read more about the major/minor.

Like Ethnic Studies on Facebook!

Some facts from the Census Bureau:

The first American Indian Day was celebrated in May 1916 in New York. Red Fox James, a Blackfeet Indian, rode horseback from state to state, getting endorsements from 24 state governments, to have a day to honor American Indians. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed a joint congressional resolution designating November 1990 as “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations have been issued every year since 1994. This Facts for Features presents statistics for American Indians and Alaska Natives, as this is one of the six major Office of Management and Budget race categories.

Note: Unless otherwise specified, the statistics in the “Population” section refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races.

Population

5.2 million

The nation’s population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race. They made up about 2 percent of the total population in 2013. Of this total, about 49 percent were American Indian and Alaska Native only, and about 51 percent were American Indian and Alaska Native in combination with one or more other races. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

11.2 million

The projected population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination, on July 1, 2060. They would comprise 2.7 percent of the total population. Source: Population projections <http://www.census.gov/population/projections/files/summary/NP2012-T4.xls>

432,343

The American Indian and Alaska Native population, alone or in combination, 65 and over. Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

14

Number of states with more than 100,000 American Indian and Alaska Native residents, alone or in combination, in 2013. These states were California, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, New York, North Carolina, Florida, Alaska, Michigan, Oregon, Colorado and Minnesota. Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/12_1YR/S0201/0100000US.04000/popgr oup~009>

14.3%

The proportion of Alaska’s population identified as American Indian and Alaska Native, alone or in combination, in 2013, the highest share for this race group of any state. Alaska was followed by Oklahoma (7.5 percent), New Mexico (9.1), South Dakota (8.5 percent) and Montana (6.8 percent). Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_1YR_DP05&prodType=table>

30.8

Median age for those who were American Indian and Alaska Native, alone or in combination, in 2013. This compares with a median age of 37.5 for the U.S. population as a whole. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Reservations

325

Number of federally recognized American Indian reservations in 2012. All in all, excluding Hawaiian Home Lands, there are 630 American Indian and Alaska Native legal and statistical areas for which the Census Bureau provides statistics. Source: Census Bureau Geography Division <https://www.census.gov/geo/reference/gtc/gtc_aiannha.html>

Tribes

566

Number of federally recognized Indian tribes. Data courtesy of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 2013 <http://www.bia.gov/cs/groups/public/documents/text/idc015898.pdf>

Families

1,698,815

The number of American Indian and Alaska Native family households in 2013 (households with a householder who was American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination with another race). Of these, 38.5 percent were married-couple families, including those with children. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

6.1 %

The percentage of American Indian and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination with other races, who were grandparents living with at least one of their grandchildren in 2013. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Housing

53.9%

The percentage of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native householders who owned their own home in 2013. This is compared with 64.0 percent of the overall population. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Languages

20.0%

Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination. age 5 and older who spoke a language other than English at home in 2011-2013, compared with 21 percent for the nation as a whole. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Education

82.2%

The percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma, GED certificate or alternative credential. In addition, 17.6 percent obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher. In comparison, 86.3 percent of the overall population had a high school diploma or higher and 29.1 percent had a bachelor’s degree or higher. Source: 2011-2013, American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

39.8%

Single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older whose bachelor’s degree or higher was in science and engineering, or science and engineering-related fields in 2013. This compares with 43.7 percent for all people 25 and older with a bachelor’s degree or higher. Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/12_1YR/C15010C>

Source: 2001-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_C15010&prodType=table>

13.5%

Percentage of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree, graduate or professional degree in 2013. Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Jobs

25.9%

The percentage of civilian-employed single-race American Indian and Alaska Native people 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations in 2013. In addition, 25.2 percent worked in service occupations and 22.7 percent in sales and office occupations. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Veterans

152,897

The number of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native veterans of the U.S. armed forces in 2011-2013. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_B21001C&prodType=table>

Income and Poverty

$36,252

The median household income of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native households in 2013. This compares with $52,176 for the nation as a whole. Source: 2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

29.2%

The percent of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives that were in poverty in 2013, the highest rate of any race group. For the nation as a whole, the poverty rate was 15.9 percent. Source: 2011-2013 American Community Survey <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/12_1YR/S0201//popgroup~002|004|006|0 09|012>

<http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_13_3YR_S0201&prodType=table>

Health Insurance

26.9%

The percentage of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives who lacked health insurance coverage in 2013. For the nation as a whole, the corresponding percentage was 14.5 percent. Source: 2013 Current Population Survey <http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/cpstables/032014/health/People%20Without%20Health%20Insurance%20Coverage%20by%20Race%20and%20Hispanic%20Origin.xls>
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Summer-Fall 2014 Newsletter

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